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Domestic Lumber

Wood is what we're all about here at Barn Door Lumber! We stock over forty different species of domestic and imported lumber.

Our lumber is stored kiln dried rough, in a wide variety of dimensions.

  • Quartersawn and rift-sawn is available from stock, in red oak, white oak, and other species by request.
  • At your request, we can mill your lumber selection to S4S.

(NOTE: The samples shown below may vary in color from the real wood samples due to different monitor designs. Please contact Barn Door Lumber Company for samples)

Some species are subject to availability and quantities ordered, please call us to verify stock.

Alder

alderAlder is characterized by its straight grain and even texture. Its reddish brown color often looks similar to Cherry. While Alder is often used to mimic Cherry, its rich tone is beautiful and certainly warrants use for its own distinct qualities. Though it dents relatively easy, it offers a stable surface.

Best Uses:

  • Furniture
  • Cabinets
  • Moldings

Available in 4/4, 5/4

Aromatic Cedar

Cedar

The fine-grained, soft brittle pinkish- to brownish-red heartwood is fragrant, very light and very durable, even in contact with soil. Because of its rot resistance, the wood is used for fence posts. The aromatic wood is avoided by moths, so it is in demand as lining for clothes chests and closets, often referred to as cedar closets and cedar chests.

Best Uses:

  • Fences and Posts
  • Decks
  • Closets
  • Cedar Chests

Available in 4/4

Ash

ash

Ash is a ring-porous wood with prominent growth ring patterns. The sapwood is light in color and can very from a creamy color to nearly white. Depending on the species, the heartwood can vary in color from pale yellow to light brown with greyish tones, sometimes tinged with red. A very straight-grained wood, Ash can appear similar to Red Oak, with a coarse, even texture.

Best Uses:

  • Water Skis/Oars
  • Baseball Bats
  • Handles/Boat Parts
  • Flooring/Paneling

Available in 4/4, 5/4, 8/4

Basswood

ash

The light, soft characteristics of Basswood make it easy to work with both hand and machine tools. It has low strength properties, but once dry, provides good dimensional stability. It has poor nail-holding characteristics, but screws and glues with relatively good results. Basswood yields a good finish with either paint or stain.

Best Uses:

  • Carvings/turnings
  • Furniture substrates
  • Boxes/Crates
  • Plywood

Available in 4/4, 8/4, 16/4

Beech

beech

Beech is a heavy, pale -colored, medium-to-hard wood. It is a fine, tight grain and has large medullar rays. Beech is similar in appearance to maple and birch. One excellent characteristic of Beech is that fact that it does stain and polish well. Beech is a wood with high crush strength and medium stiffness.

Best Uses:

  • Commercial flooring
  • Furniture
  • Musical instruments
  • Decorative veneers

Available in 4/4

Birch

birch

Birch is a very heavy, strong, durable wood. It is hard and stiff, with excellent shock-resistance. With its good machining qualities, birch wood sands satisfactorily and has excellent holding ability when nailed.

Best Uses:

  • Flooring
  • Furniture
  • Drumsticks/Violin bows
  • Veneers

Available in 4/4

Birdseye Maple (Acer saccharum)

birdseye maple

Birdeye Maple is a pale wood, darkening toward the heart, with distinct red-brown latewood lines. It is a rare and mysterious characteristic found in hard maple. There have been theories as to how Birdseye maple forms, but no scientific evidence has been presented to verify the true roots of its existence.

Best Uses:

  • Custom pool cues
  • Furniture
  • Musical instruments

Available in 4/4

Cherry

cherry

Generally an orange to pinkish brown. Color tends to darken and redden with age. Grain is typically straight with bland patterning, exhibiting a very uniform color and appearance. It is hard and dense, making it more difficult to work than lighter woods, but its straight and uniform grain give it a reasonable workability.

Best Uses:

  • Cabinets
  • Furniture
  • Flooring

Available in 4/4, 5/4, 6/4, 8/4, 12/4

Curly Maple (Acer spp.)

curly-maple

Curly Maple is not actually a species, but simply a description of a figure in the grain—it occurs most often in soft maples, but is also seen in hard maples. It is so called because the ripples in the grain pattern create a three dimensional effect that appears as if the grain has “curled” along the length of the board.

Best Uses:

  • Veneers
  • Furniture
  • Cabinets

Available in 4/4

Cypress

cypress

Cypress tends to be a light, yellowish brown. Sapwood is nearly white. Some boards can have scattered pockets of darker wood that have been attacked by fungi. Overall, Cypress is easy to work with hand and machine tools, though sharp cutters ought to be used to prevent lifting of the grain. Also, the wood has been reported by some sources to have a moderate dulling effect on cutting edges. Cypress has good gluing,  nailing, finishing, and paint-holding properties.

Best Uses:

  • Exterior Construction
  • Docks
  • Interior Trim

Available in 4/4

Douglas Fir Vertical Grain

DougFirVertGrain

Douglas Fir can vary in color based upon age and location of tree. Usually a light brown color with a hint of red and/or yellow, with darker growth rings. It typically machines well, but has a moderate blunting effect on cutters. Accepts stains, glues, and finishes well.

Best Uses:

  • Plywood
  • Veneers
  • Construction lumber

Available in 3/4

Flame Birch (Betula spp.)

birch flame

Flame birch is a domestic wood reported to be full of natural waxes that render it waterproof. The tough and durable bark is also reported to remain in the soil long after the inside of the tree has rotted away. The fully grown tree is reported to be often 70 to 100 feet in height and 30 inches in diameter. Bending strength in the air-dry condition is very high. Compression strength parallel to grain in the air-dry condition is high. Hardness is rated as medium, and the wood is heavy.

Best Uses:

  • Decorative Veneers
  • Furniture
  • Cabinets

Available in 8/4

Hickory

hickory flat

Heartwood tends to be light to medium brown, with a reddish hue; sapwood is a paler yellowish brown. Difficult to work, with tearout being common during machining operations if cutting edges are not kept sharp; the wood tends to blunt cutting edges. Glues, stains, and finishes well. Responds well to steam bending.

Best Uses:

  • Tool handles
  • Ladder rungs
  • Flooring

Available in 4/4, 5/4

Maple Hard

maplehard

Hard Maple lumber is most commonly used rather than its heartwood. Sapwood color ranges from nearly white, to an off-white cream color, sometimes with a reddish or golden hue. Maple has a tendency to burn when being machined with high-speed cutters such as in a router. Turns, glues, and finishes well, though blotches can occur when staining, and a pre-conditioner, gel stain, or toner may be necessary to get an even color.

Best Uses:

  • Flooring
  • Veneer
  • Butcher Blocks
  • Musical instruments

Available in 4/4, 5/4, 6/4, 8/4

Maple Soft

maplesoft

The sapwood of Soft Maple varies in color from creamy white to greyish-white, and is sometimes marked with darker colored pith flecks. Although not as rich as Hard Maple, the heartwood is similar in color, with reddish-brown tones ranging from light to dark. The growth rings of Soft Maple are not as distinct as those of Hard Maple. Soft Maple is straight-grained, without the exceptional burled or birds-eye characteristics that can be found in Hard Maple.

Best Uses:

  • Kitchen Cabinets
  • Furniture
  • Decorative Veneers

Available in 4/4, 5/4, 8/4

Oak Red

red oak

Red oak has a light to medium reddish-brown color, though there can be a fair amount of variation in color. It has medium-to-large pores and a fairly coarse grain. The pores are so large and open that it is said that a person can blow into one end of the wood, and air will come out the other end: provided that the grain runs straight enough. It produces good results with hand and machine tools. Responds well to steam-bending. Easy to glue, and takes stain and finishes very well.

Best Uses:

  • Cabinetry
  • Furniture
  • Flooring
  • Interior Trim

Available in 4/4, 5/4, 6/4, 8/4, 10/4

Oak Red Rift

Red Oak Rift

Rift sawn Red Oak is similar to quarter sawn but cut at a slight angle to the radiaus of the log creating a tight straight grain and little or no flecking and a very uniform look.

Best Uses:

  • Cabinets
  • Furniture
  • Flooring

Available in 4/4

Oak White Quarter Sawn

white oak qtr sawn

Quartersawn White Oak has dramatic figure called flecking, produced from sawing radially from the center of the log and exposing medullar rays.

Best Uses:

  • Cabinets
  • Furniture
  • Flooring

Available in 4/4

Osage Orange (Maclura pomifera)

osage-orange

eartwood is golden to bright yellow, which  almost certainly ages to a darker medium brown with time: primarily due to exposure to UV light. It has an even and straight grain with a fine to medium texture. Working this wood can be difficult due to its hardness and density, though it is reported to have little dulling effect on cutting edges. It turns well, and also takes stains, glues and finishes well.

Best Uses:

  • Fence Posts
  • Archery Bows
  • Musical instruments

Available in

Pine Eastern White C Select

eastern-white-pine

Heartwood is a light brown, sometimes with a slightly reddish hue, sapwood is a pale yellow to nearly white. Color tends to darken with age. The grain is straight with an even, medium texture. Eastern White Pine is easy to work with both hand and machine tools. It glues and finishes well.

Best Uses:

  • Interior millwork
  • Construction lumber
  • Carving

Available in 4/4, 5/4, 6/4, 8/4

Pine Eastern White #1&2

eastern-white-pine

Heartwood is a light brown, sometimes with a slightly reddish hue, sapwood is a pale yellow to nearly white. Color tends to darken with age. The grain is straight with an even, medium texture. Eastern White Pine is easy to work with both hand and machine tools. It glues and finishes well.

Best Uses:

  • Interior millwork
  • Construction lumber
  • Carving

Available in 4/4

Pine Southern Yellow

pine yellow sel C-better 00

Southern Yellow Pine is highly resistant to wear; therefore, it is suitable for flooring, decks, patios, marinas, boardwalks and other high-traffic applications. It is also one of the easiest softwoods to pressure-treat with preservatives, as a result, treated Southern Yellow Pine is one of the largest segments of the Pine market.

Best Uses:

  • Flooring
  • Decks and Patios

Available in 4/4, 5/4

Sassafrass

sassafras-gw

Heartwood is a medium to light brown, sometimes with an orange or olive hue. Color tends to darken with age. The grain is straight, with a coarse uneven texture. It is easy to work with both hand and machine tools. Sassafras also has good dimensional stability once dry. Glues, stains, and finishes well.

Best Uses:

  • Utility lumber
  • Fence posts
  • Furniture

Available in 4/4

Walnut

walnut

Heartwood can range from a lighter pale brown to a dark chocolate brown with darker brown streaks. Color can sometimes have a grey, purple, or reddish cast. Typically easy to work provided the grain is straight and regular. Planer tearout can sometimes be a problem when surfacing pieces with irregular or figured grain. Glues, stains, and finishes well, (though walnut is rarely stained). Responds well to steam bending.

Best Uses:

  • Cabinets
  • Furniture
  • Gunstocks

Available in 4/4, 8/4

Western Red Cedar

western-red-cedar

Western Redcedar is typically reddish to pinkish brown, often with random streaks and bands of darker red/brown areas. Easy to work with both hand or machine tools, though it dents and scratches very easily due to its softness. Glues and finishes well, though as is the case with most softwoods with closed pores, even staining can be a challenge.

Best Uses:

  • Shingles
  • Exterior siding and lumber
  • Musical instruments

Available in 4/4, 5/4, 8/4, Timbers

Yellow Poplar

yellow popular

On most boards, Poplar is a light cream to yellowish brown color, with occasional streaks of gray or green. Very easy to work in almost all regards,  one of Poplar’s only downsides is its softness. Due to its low density, Poplar can sometimes leave fuzzy surfaces and edges: especially during shaping or sanding. Sanding to finer grits of sandpaper may be necessary to obtain a smooth surface.

Best Uses:

  • Furniture frames
  • Plywood
  • Crates

Available in 4/4, 5/4, 6/4, 8/4

 

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Call us today: 1-800-894-7966 • 2020 N. Hemlock Rd., Hemlock, MI 48626 • Email Us

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